Astro Blog for August

Written by on August 1, 2014

Planets

Venus, August 1st

If you are up early on from August 1st (4am) Venus will start to appear brilliantly in the Eastern sky. At magnitude –3.8. Unmissable.

Saturn still remains an attractive sight. in the Constellation Libra from nightfall until the early hours. If you look south West, at a Magnitude of around +0.5  The planet is easily visible as its roughly twice as bright as any background stars, Through a good Telescope, its magnificent Rings can be easily seen.

Neptune. 29th August

Neptune comes into oppostition (When it is nearest the earth) At a magnitude of around +7.9 it should be easily found, even with use of Binoculars in the constellation of Aquarius.

What is Magnitude?

Magnitude is the logarithmic measure of the brightness of an object, in astronomy, t is measured in a specific wavelength, usually in optical or near-infrared wavelengths.

The Basics way to look at it is, – is Bright and + is Dull, So our own star, The Sun has an apparent magnitude of −27, a full moon −13 and the brightest planet Venus measures −5. The brightest man-made objects, Iridium flares are ranked at −9 and the International Space Station −6.

What is an Iridium Flare?

I am no expert on these, infact, i have only ever seen them by mistake, but i know someone who likes capturing them on camera. So, i’d ask you to go and check out Mary’s article about them.

For a better understanding of these, i suggest you go here:  http://marysastronomyblogs.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/what-are-iridium-flares.html

Iridium Flares. Courtesy of Mary Spicer

August 10th Supermoon: This will be around 13% larger than normal. The best of the 5 we have this year as some predict.

apogeeperigee2006_ayiomamitis-nasa

What is a Supermoon?

A Supermoon is the coincidence of a full moon with the closest approach the Moon makes to the Earth on its elliptical orbit, resulting in the largest apparent size of the lunar disk as seen from Earth. We astronomers call this perigee.

Astronomers use the term perigee which come s from the Greek words, Peri- Near and Gee- Earth

The association of the Moon with both oceanic and crustal tides has led to claims that the Supermoon phenomenon may be associated with increased risk of events such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, but the evidence of such a link is widely held to be unconvincing. There are many things that people like to link to Supermoons, For centuries legend has held that full moons make people go crazy. Full moons have been linked in popular culture with a rise in suicides and even epileptic seizures, but there’s little to no scientific evidence backing these ideas up.

The Moon’s distance varies each month between approximately 357,000 km (222,000 mi) and 406,000 km (252,000 mi) due to its elliptical orbit around the Earth (distances given are based on centre-to-centre of Moon and Earth). A full moon at perigee is up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than one at its farthest point, or apogee. The most recent occurrence was on July 12, 2014

 DOUBLE STAR OF THE MONTH : August 2014 by Darren Murray

doubles

Albireo, Beta 1 Cyg, HD 183912, SAO087301

RA: 19h 30m 43.3s

DEC: +27 57 35

Constellation : Cygnus

Albireo is one of the most Famous Double stars, and a Favourite target for Double star observers and small scopes the world over.

It’s a highly contrasting system the  primary star Albiero A is a dazzling 3rdmagnitude yellow star and its companion star Albiero B is a dazzling 5thmagnitude Azure Blue.

Set against a magnificent deep milky way star field this is truly a Gem of the night sky and every visual observer weather into double stars or not should at least take a look at its beauty at least once.

Clear Skies !!

Darren Murray

Perseids Meteor Shower

This is normally a  very good Meteors shower, although with this years Full/Supermoon only the  brightest ones will be visible. Commonly known as shooting stars, they can sometimes turn into bright fireballs that can last a few seconds.

The Perseid meteor shower is the most famous of all the meteor showers, providing an opportunity for non-enthusiasts to see a meteor. Even with the Delta Aquarids happening now, you may still get to see some Perseids too if you are lucky. The Perseids can be seen from the end of July maybe one or two an hour. By the 10 August up to 15 meteors an hour can be seen on a clear sky.  Sadly, this is the night of the “Supermoon”

The peak dates to see the Perseid meteor shower are between the 12-13 August when up to 100 meteors an hour can be seen! SO get comfortable, look up and enjoy the show, you can still be lucky to see a good few, especially in a dark sight area.

Where to look?

FEA_Perseid _Vic_Lg

If you are lucky, you can try your hand at capturing meteors on Camera, well worth the try. You may even be lucky enough to get a fireball!

ISS Passes For August

August is a good month for visible ISS Passes, so grab your camera’s, set up on a tripod, try different settings, ISO 400, set to 15-30 second exposure, and snap away. This is what you can end up with.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The information below is from http://www.heavens-above.com

(Visible from Baginton)

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
28 Jul -2.0 00:47:09 29° ESE 00:47:09 29° ESE 00:49:17 10° E visible
28 Jul -3.4 02:20:00 15° W 02:22:41 78° S 02:26:03 10° E visible
28 Jul -0.8 23:59:57 12° E 23:59:57 12° E 00:00:22 10° E visible
29 Jul -3.4 01:32:49 39° WSW 01:33:53 70° S 01:37:15 10° E visible
29 Jul -3.3 03:07:12 10° W 03:10:34 73° S 03:13:56 10° ESE visible
30 Jul -2.9 00:45:38 50° ESE 00:45:38 50° ESE 00:48:26 10° E visible
30 Jul -3.4 02:18:30 11° W 02:21:46 80° S 02:25:08 10° E visible
30 Jul -1.3 23:58:30 19° E 23:58:30 19° E 23:59:36 10° E visible
31 Jul -3.4 01:31:21 29° W 01:32:57 81° S 01:36:20 10° E visible
31 Jul -3.1 03:06:17 10° W 03:09:35 52° SSW 03:12:52 10° ESE visible
01 Aug -3.4 00:44:18 74° SE 00:44:18 74° SE 00:47:30 10° E visible
01 Aug -3.3 02:17:27 10° W 02:20:48 65° SSW 02:24:08 10° ESE visible
01 Aug -1.3 23:57:29 20° E 23:57:29 20° E 23:58:41 10° E visible
02 Aug -3.4 01:30:23 28° W 01:32:00 75° S 01:35:22 10° ESE visible
02 Aug -2.5 03:05:26 10° W 03:08:28 32° SSW 03:11:30 10° SE visible
02 Aug -1.2 21:27:57 10° S 21:28:37 13° S 21:28:37 13° S visible
03 Aug -2.3 00:44:21 37° E 00:44:21 37° E 00:46:33 10° E visible
03 Aug -2.9 02:17:21 16° W 02:19:45 42° SSW 02:22:57 10° SE visible
03 Aug -1.3 20:40:14 10° SSE 20:41:41 12° SE 20:43:09 10° ESE visible
03 Aug -3.0 22:14:35 10° SW 22:17:46 43° SSE 22:18:09 41° SE visible
03 Aug -0.6 23:50:59 10° W 23:51:09 11° W 23:51:09 11° W visible
04 Aug -1.1 01:33:29 16° ESE 01:33:29 16° ESE 01:34:17 10° ESE visible
04 Aug -1.8 03:06:39 17° SW 03:07:13 18° SW 03:09:33 10° S visible
04 Aug -2.6 21:26:01 10° SW 21:29:02 32° SSE 21:32:05 10° E visible
04 Aug -3.3 23:02:10 10° WSW 23:05:15 69° SW 23:05:15 69° SW visible
05 Aug -2.1 20:37:37 10° SSW 20:40:20 23° SSE 20:43:05 10° E visible
05 Aug -3.4 22:13:22 10° WSW 22:16:42 65° SSE 22:18:29 25° E visible
05 Aug -1.4 23:50:00 10° W 23:51:21 22° W 23:51:21 22° W visible
06 Aug -3.2 21:24:37 10° WSW 21:27:53 53° SSE 21:31:10 10° E visible
06 Aug -3.3 23:01:09 10° W 23:04:17 74° WSW 23:04:17 74° WSW visible
07 Aug -2.8 20:35:57 10° SW 20:39:07 41° SSE 20:42:17 10° E visible
07 Aug -3.4 22:12:19 10° W 22:15:40 80° S 22:17:06 32° E visible
07 Aug -1.0 23:49:00 10° W 23:49:57 18° W 23:49:57 18° W visible
08 Aug -3.4 21:23:29 10° WSW 21:26:49 74° S 21:29:51 12° E visible
08 Aug -2.7 23:00:08 10° W 23:02:42 48° WSW 23:02:42 48° WSW visible
09 Aug -3.2 20:34:40 10° WSW 20:37:59 63° SSE 20:41:18 10° E visible
09 Aug -3.4 22:11:17 10° W 22:14:38 78° S 22:15:27 48° ESE visible
09 Aug -0.5 23:48:02 10° W 23:48:17 12° W 23:48:17 12° W visible
10 Aug -3.4 21:22:25 10° W 21:25:46 81° S 21:28:10 18° E visible
10 Aug -1.8 22:59:08 10° W 23:01:01 28° WSW 23:01:01 28° WSW visible
11 Aug -3.3 20:33:34 10° W 20:36:54 79° S 20:40:16 10° E visible
11 Aug -3.3 22:10:15 10° W 22:13:33 60° SSW 22:13:44 58° S visible
12 Aug -3.3 21:21:22 10° W 21:24:42 71° S 21:26:27 26° ESE visible
12 Aug -1.0 22:58:13 10° W 22:59:18 17° WSW 22:59:18 17° WSW visible
13 Aug -3.3 20:32:30 10° W 20:35:50 79° S 20:39:11 10° E visible
13 Aug -2.4 22:09:14 10° W 22:12:02 37° SW 22:12:02 37° SW visible
14 Aug -2.9 21:20:19 10° W 21:23:34 50° SSW 21:24:47 31° SE visible
15 Aug -3.1 20:31:25 10° W 20:34:44 62° SSW 20:37:33 14° ESE visible
15 Aug -1.4 22:08:25 10° W 22:10:24 20° SW 22:10:24 20° SW visible
16 Aug -2.1 21:19:20 10° W 21:22:18 30° SSW 21:23:11 26° S visible
Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
17 Aug -2.5 20:30:21 10° W 20:33:31 40° SSW 20:36:00 15° SE visible
17 Aug -0.6 22:08:30 10° WSW 22:08:51 11° SW 22:08:51 11° SW visible
18 Aug -1.2 21:18:42 10° WSW 21:20:53 16° SW 21:21:42 15° SSW visible
19 Aug -1.5 20:29:27 10° W 20:32:10 23° SSW 20:34:36 12° SSE visible
21 Aug -0.7 20:29:15 10° WSW 20:30:39 12° SW 20:32:03 10° SSW visible

 

From: @astroforfun

Tagged as

Radio Warwickshire

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